« Novel Food #40: the finale (readings and recipes) | Main | romanesco broccoli soup / zuppa di broccolo romanesco »

November 30, 2020

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Wendy Klik

So sorry about your mishap. You never realize how often you use a part of your body until it is incapacitated for a bit. Glad you are on the mend. Thanks for hosting. Loved the book.

Debra Eliotseats

Thanks for the links to all your scone recipes AND for this great appetizer! Hope your typing pinkie finger is back to work and hope you are doing well. Thanks for hosting!

Frank

I love the look of that honeynut squash. Gorgeous deep orange color makes me think it must be full of flavor. So much nicer that butternut, at least around here they tend to be pale and wan and almost tasteless. Which is more or less the case with most winter squashes I can find locally. I'm sure you have better luck in California. I'll have to be on the look out for it. (I also have good luck with Kabochas.)

Claudia

Always nice to meet a new squash! And your recipe reminds me of a breadfruit crostini I made last month, and served with an eggplant dip. I enjoyed your book choice, and have now read her two follow-up novels.

Simona Carini

Thank you, Wendy :) Glad you enjoyed the reading.

Simona Carini

You are welcome, Debra. Recovery is a slow process: every little step counts :)

Simona Carini

Frank, the article in Bon Appétit that I reference describes what you also report as the reason behind the quest for a better butternut squash.
The winter squash I get from farmers I know are good, with differences related to the individual variety. I like butternut squash for soup. I like kabocha sliced and roasted. For stuffing I like delicata Candystick Dessert. I have not made gnocchi di zucca> for a while, but my favorite for those is Marina di Chioggia (which is not easy to find). Last year in Italy I tasted the zucca napoletana and liked that too. So many squashes to choose from :)

Simona Carini

Your breadfruit crostini with eggplant dip sounds good, Claudia. Glad you liked the book. The two follow-up novel are on my to-read list :)

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